Author Topic: NEW 2 litre HESKETH...!!!!!!!  (Read 4512 times)

Tig

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NEW 2 litre HESKETH...!!!!!!!
« on: December 02, 2013, 06:28:17 PM »
Well who has seen the bike ?

Anyone else excited... there has been lots of interest...

tig

Miti

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Re: NEW 2 litre HESKETH...!!!!!!!
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2013, 08:20:17 PM »
Looks pretty good to me...  :D

(FOR BIGGER IMAGE - CLICK ON PICTURE BELOW)



Uses an S&S "X-Wedge" V-Twin engine - 117 cu (1,917cc) putting out 100bhp at the rear wheel.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Engine:
 1950cc 56 degree V-Twin 120 BHP
 Belt driven 3 cam design

 Transmission:
 6 Speed with Baker FFP billet primary.

 Final Drive:
 Chain

 Wheels:
 Brock's performance BST carbon fibre 19 x 120 front, 19 x 180 rear

 Brakes:
 Beringer twin 4 piston front and single 4 piston rear.

 Frame:
 Chromoly steel. Tig welded

 Fuel tank:
 22.7 L fuel cell mounted beneath the engine

 Exhaust:
 Stainless steel 2 into 1 into 3

 Suspension:
 Ohlins road / track

More about this on the Hesketh Motorcycles Website

There's also a mention of HM moving from Kingswood to Redhill in Surrey...

Jeff

« Last Edit: December 02, 2013, 08:38:22 PM by Miti »
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

HOCAdmin

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Re: NEW 2 litre HESKETH...!!!!!!!
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2013, 12:25:15 PM »
Paul Sleeman has sent details of an interview he's given to the on-line motorcyling magazine "Faster and Faster" about the new Hesketh 24:

They've kindly given us permission to reproduce the text of the interview here.  (If you want to see the interview complete with the embedded photos, please visit the Faster and Faster Website:)

Quote from: Faster and Faster.net - 4th December 2013
The new Hesketh 24 (top) is a revial of the 1970s/1980s Lord Hesketh-James Hunt legacy. Those red and blue stripes still look cool as ever...

In 1972, when he was all of 22 years old, Lord Thomas Alexander Fermor-Hesketh founded his Formula 1 racing team and, with James Hunt, went on to win a few races in the early- to mid-1970s. Hunt, famous for his playboy lifestyle (Rolls-Royce cars, private helicopters, endless bottles of champagne and, of course, copious amounts of… er, “crumpet”), finished in 4th place in the 1975 Formula 1 world championship, driving the Lord’s Hesketh 308 F1 race car.

Shortly thereafter, Lord Hesketh withdrew from F1 but did go on to build motorcycles – the Hesketh V1000 and the Hesketh Vampire – in the early 1980s. It was all over by the mid-1980s (you can read the full story on Wikipedia) but now, after a 30-year hiatus, Hesketh are back. This time, with British entrepreneur Paul Sleeman at the helm, the company plans to build a range of new, Hesketh-branded motorcycles, starting with the Hesketh 24, which will go on sale from February next year.

As you can see in the photograph above, the Hesketh 24 gets a paintjob that’s clearly inspired by James Hunt’s 1970s Hesketh F1 race car, which also used to bear the number '24.' The bike, only 24 units of which will be built, is powered by a 1,950cc V-twin, which produces about 120 horsepower. Spec is top class – Ohlins suspension, Beringer brakes with 4-piston calipers at the front, BST carbonfibre wheels, TIG-welded chrome-molybdenum chassis, bespoke 2-into-1-into-3 stainless steel exhaust system and, interestingly enough, a 22.7-litre fuel tank that’s mounted beneath the engine.

We were quite intrigued with the new Hesketh 24 and fired off a few questions to Hesketh. Here are some excerpts from what Paul Sleeman had to say about the Hesketh 24 and his future plans for the brand:

Paul Sleeman talks about the Hesketh 24 and his future plans for the iconic British motorcycle brand...

On how, and why, he has revived Hesketh Motorcycles

"When we took over the Hesketh Motorcycles marque in 2010, it was always in our plans to see a modern interpretation of the original machine. To put the Hesketh name on something that captures the essence of the original bikes, but with modern engineering to make it truly competitive in 2013. The Hesketh 24 is just the beginning of where we hope to take the Hesketh brand. Indeed, after the release of the limited edition 24 early next year, we will go on to produce a twin-seat, sport-tourer version of the 24."

On why Hesketh motorcycles are (justifiably?) expensive

"The limited edition Hesketh 24 retails at £35,000. This takes into account the top quality components such Ohlins suspension, Beringer brakes, Brock’s carbonfibre wheels and other specialty parts such as the F1-grade fuel cell mounted beneath the engine and, of course, a massive 1,950cc V-twin engine. Hesketh Motorcycles was always a luxury brand that wanted to offer the highest quality motorcycle engineering in a British bike. We aren’t changing what Hesketh is about, we just want to bring in to the 21st century!"

On the Hesketh 24’s engine

"It is no secret that the engine is an S&S X-wedge. There was no doubt that we could not go any further with development of the original Weslake-designed motor, having worked on it extensively in original Hesketh restoration projects over the last three years. We spent a great deal of time considering the right thing to do, and explored many options, including developing our own V6. However, we came to the conclusion that it is cost prohibitive for a small company to meet the current emissions targets and the cost of validation for different countries. Unfortunately, a big V-twin is a difficult thing to get right, and that is why we are proud to be using such a reliable motor as the S&S. We know this will give the Hesketh 24 the ultimate edge when it comes to torque – something that the original bikes were often criticised for."

On whether Hesketh motorcycles will be available worldwide

"The Hesketh 24 is available worldwide, the engine is fully homologated Euro 3 compliant and can be sold in all 49 states of the USA. We understand that this bike will appeal to owners around the world and we have already received positive feedback from countries such as Australia, Russia and the USA."

On the new Hesketh connect with those who love Hesketh motorcycles from the 1980s

"We have a very strong relationship with the Hesketh Owners Club – we even host their annual meeting from our Kingswood showroom. The original owners have been very supportive since the brand passed into our hands in 2010, but it was always clear that our aim was to eventually produce a modern Hesketh motorcycle. We hope the Hesketh 24 retains enough of the Hesketh character, style and quality to ensure existing Hesketh owners and fans will move forward with us into this new chapter for the marque."

We thank Paul Sleeman for taking the time to answer our questions, and we wish him all the best for his future plans for Hesketh Motorcycles

HOCAdmin
« Last Edit: December 05, 2013, 12:31:27 PM by HOCAdmin »
A man with a plan... occasionally...

velocollins

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Re: NEW 2 litre HESKETH...!!!!!!!
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2013, 02:21:10 PM »
Good to see the Hesketh development and brand moving forward.  Lets wish Paul good luck in a very competitive market.

The excitement reminds me of when I took delivery of one of the first 2.3 Triumph Rockets just after launch.

Slight difference in the power output ratio from my current Hesketh 1000.  Willl be an interesting discussion with the Insurance company and my classic rider policy.

Regards   Richard

David S

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Re: NEW 2 litre HESKETH...!!!!!!!
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2013, 09:40:42 PM »
This is exciting on a number of levels.

First the new Hesketh 24 itself:-

•   It looks just right.
•   It is clearly a Hesketh; it is what one might expect to follow the V1000.
•   That is to say it is a big V twin with twin shocks and those tell-tale styling cues most conspicuous in the tank shape and headlamp cowl.
•   It is the right solution. By choosing some of the best existing proven technology it is a low risk solution to get the Hesketh brand back in the lime light and secure market share.

And some bonuses:-

•   Success for the Hesketh 24 will ensure follow on models.
•   Hesketh Motorcycles success is also just what owners of existing V1000 and Vampires need.
•   This consolidates the business base to enable continued support.

I think Paul Sleeman has been very wise in choosing this approach and I look forward to the day when the HOC has a rally line up including the Hesketh 25 alongside Northamptonshire built V1000 and Vampires.

DWS

Miti

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Re: NEW 2 litre HESKETH...!!!!!!!
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2013, 12:33:41 AM »
...It is the right solution. By choosing some of the best existing proven technology it is a low risk solution to get the Hesketh brand back in the lime light and secure market share....

I quite agree David... There are some interesting comparisons between Paul's approach and that of Lord Hesketh:

Engine:  From a proven engine supplier (Weslake - S&S)

Suspension:  State of the art technology (Marzocchi - Ohlins)

Brakes:  Ditto (Brembo - Beringer)

Wheels:  Ditto (Astralite - Brocks (carbon fibre))

Frame:  Ditto (Rickman/Hesketh - Racing Innovations/Hesketh)

And it looks GREAT..!!  :D

Jeff
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

Miti

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Re: NEW 2 litre HESKETH...!!!!!!!
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2014, 12:13:28 PM »
Well, that's the new Hesketh 24 released for sale and t'interweb is now stuffed full of the same bumph, over and over again...

It was released to the public on 16th June and appeared at the Goodwood Festival of Speed last weekend.  Did anyone see it..?

The Top Gear website appears to have had the best bunch of photos, so I "captured" them to show here:























Enjoy..!!

Jeff
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

Miti

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Re: NEW 2 litre HESKETH...!!!!!!!
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2014, 10:51:58 PM »
23 second "You Tube" clip of Hesketh 24 @ Goodwood...

Hesketh 24 Video

Miti
« Last Edit: July 02, 2014, 10:54:08 PM by Miti »
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

Miti

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Re: NEW 2 litre HESKETH...!!!!!!!
« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2014, 01:18:24 PM »
I like a bit of techie stuff, so I searched about for bumph on the new S&S X-Wedge Engine HMC are using in the Hesketh 24...

This is shamelessly plucked from the Motorcycle USA website and makes for very interesting reading...

Quote
Based on engine models that predate the X-Wedge, S&S has three different engines that comply with current EPA regulations. They are all carbureted, single-cam designs available in the following sizes: 96-inch, 113-inch, and 124-inch. S&S is confident that these configurations will be available for quite some time as they meet current standards. In addition, there are still fuel-injected versions of these displacements that can go through the certification process as well.

Engineering for the new engine began late in 2002. Within the span of just 12 months there was a prototype design ready to be built. December of 2004 saw a working prototype known as Fred to those involved with the project. By the spring of 2005 S&S produced the first X-Wedge prototype that would find its way into a chassis (appropriately named Wilma) that would be used as a test bed for the new engine. By the spring of 2005, Fred was undergoing some serious testing. Between the on-road version that crisscrossed the Wisconsin countryside, and two separate dyno test regimens, the program was moving forward at a fast pace. One of the main concerns was that the new engine be bulletproof - without a proven, reliable design there was no reason to proceed further with the project. One of the dyno testing procedures simulated operation of the engine at 3200 rpm for a total of 800 hours; the other ran the rpm up and down from idle to wide open throttle for 200 hours. If there were any design flaws, these tests would certainly flush them out.

Manufacture of the X-Wedge would bring into play many components and designs garnered from the automotive industry. Some of these new pieces would be introduced to address design limitations of previous parts. Others would find their way into the design based on millions of miles of proven reliability, and cost effectiveness.

Another aspect of the engine design is the ability to create an "Engine Family" that allows for a range of different bore and stroke combinations. The X-Wedge utilizes the same configuration, meaning it can be set up for different displacements ranging from 110 inches to 139 inches. Cylinder bores will range from 4.125 to 4.500 inches, while stroke length varies between 4.125 inches and 4.375 inches. The beauty of this is that once the family of engines is produced it will be compliant with current EPA regulations (at this point the EPA has not released emission or sound level requirements beyond 2010), as are the 49-state V-series engines already available from S&S.

To clarify this point, it should be understood that compliance deals with not just the engine itself but with other issues, which affect total emissions output. Items such as final gearing, and exhaust backpressure is also used to determine compliance in conjunction with the engine. This is an important point if you are considering building a one-off custom. By purchasing an X-Wedge then building a bike within the specifications set forth in the X-Wedge's certification (i.e. S&S Closed-Loop Variable Fuel-Injection System, gearing and exhaust back pressure specifications), your motorcycle will be compliant with current EPA standards. This will allow you to build multiple one-offs without having to deal with the "one bike a lifetime" requirement set forth in recent EPA regulations.

Configuration of the X-Wedge is a departure from the engines S&S has historically produced. The major difference both technically as well as atheistically is, instead of being a 45-degree vee; the angle has been opened up to 56.25 degrees to address concerns of space limitations. Just where did the 56.25-degree figure come from, you might ask? The answer is not quite as technical as you might think. Current S&S designs utilize a series of 32 milled slots evenly spaced 11.25 degrees apart around the flywheel. These machined bores are part of the trigger mechanism for the ignition system. By adding one more segment to the existing four segments you get a total of 56.25 degrees (11.25 X 5 = 56.25). This approach would save from having to redesign the ignition system. More importantly, this additional 11.25 degrees would give engineers plenty of room to work with as they went from a single cam engine design to one that utilizes three cams

At the heart of the beast is a major player from the automotive industry, namely a one-piece, forged crankshaft. With the limitations of a multi-piece assembled camshaft known to engineers, they went about looking for a new way to do things. Instead of manufacturing multiple precision pieces then painstakingly assembling them, the new motor would begin with a single forging that would spend multiple hours in S&S's CNC-machining department. Once the chips stop flying, a beautifully machined 43-lb crankshaft is revealed. When compared to S&S's existing 117 inchers, the new-style crank weighs in with about 16-percent more weight than before. This massive piece accounts for over 25-percent of the engine's weight of 163 lbs. In addition to increased strength, this massive piece will help maintain a smooth idle despite the engine's large displacement.

Not only has the crank itself been redesigned, most components related to it have as well. Automotive-style two-piece connecting rods fit with plain bearings get the call. (Just what is a plain bearing? Akin to a bushing, the tri-metal plain bearings are manufactured from a copper, lead, and tin combination. They contain no moving parts and are able to handle very large loads relative to their physical size.) The tops of the rods are fit with completely new, 3-ring flat-top pistons machined to accept the parallel mounted intake and exhaust valves.

Keeping with the theme of automotive engineering, the roller bearings that have supported S&S's cranks in the past have been replaced by plain bearings. Why all the plain bearings, you ask? Quite simply, they work. When compared with roller bearings, plain bearings perform exceptionally well. For over 40 years automakers have been singing the praises of plain bearings when compared to roller-style bearings. They have also been used extensively in the high-performance world helping to make faster vehicles in endeavors such as drag racing and Formula One racing

Another major departure from current engine design is the use of three camshafts. A major reason for multiple cams is to provide for nearly straight pushrod angles. This is just one piece of the puzzle designed to give greater control and accuracy to the valvetrain. The three large base circle cams consist of a common intake camshaft and two individual exhaust camshafts. With maintenance and durability concerns, engineers made the decision to drive the cams with a toothed carbon-fiber timing belt from Gates. The belt winds its way around four toothed pulleys and three smooth rollers (one of which is the tensioner) located in the cam chest. Unlike chain- and gear-driven cams, the belt-drive system requires no lubrication and operates quite well at temperatures in the 180-degree range. An added benefit is how quiet the system runs when compared to traditional cam drive methods.

Sitting just above the cam-chest are a pair of massive tappet blocks that house the four hydraulic roller tappets and anchor the king-size pushrod tubes. Upsizing of the pushrod tubes was in response to crank pressure and oil system requirements. Gone are oil returns located in the cylinders. The tubes provide for ample flow of oil returning from the top of the engine and air moving from the crankcase, to the rocker boxes, on its way to the vent that culminates in the throttle body. In a departure from adjustable pushrods, S&S has employed one-piece, non-adjustable pushrods. The valvetrain is adjusted the same way as with many automotive applications. Replacing the familiar Z-style rocker arm found in most American V-Twins is a short automotive-style, adjustable roller-rocker with a 1.7:1 ratio.


This cutaway of the cylinder reveals the X-Wedge's massive amount of cooling fin area. Another way S&S assures efficient heat transfer is through the use of an aggressive liner designed to lock the thick cast-iron cylinder piece to the aluminum cylinder. Sealing of both the cylinder and the head benefit from the five-stud pattern used to affix them to the cases rather than the four studs used on H-D-style motors.Head design on the X-Wedge is totally new. The combustion chamber is wedge-shaped, thus the name of the engine. Instead of mounting the valves in the traditional manner, they have been relocated to the right side of the head and are parallel to one another. The 2-inch intake and 1.6-inch exhaust valves are positioned with the valve stems projecting at an angle that leans slightly to the right side of the engine. The combination of the head configuration and forged piston design result in a compression ratio of 9.75:1. This relatively low figure allows the X-Wedge to run well on most pump gas, and precludes the need for compression releases.

Both the heads and the cylinders are secured to the engine cases with a total of 10 mounting studs. Instead of using the customary 4 studs per cylinder, S&S has upped the ante by adding an additional stud to each cylinder, greatly enhancing the strength of the of the overall engine design. The cylinders are of a round design that allows for more even expansion and contraction than other styles. Deep within the highly finned cylinders resides a cast-iron liner attached to the aluminum cylinder in such a way that assures maximum heat transfer and cooling.

Sitting atop the heads is a rockerbox assembly that is non-structural in nature. This design allows for customization of the box itself by allowing OEM customers to come up with a design that will visually enhance the look of their motorcycle. Likewise, the same can be done with the nosecone/cam cover.

When S&S designed the X-Wedge they started out with a totally new set of cases that would allow for fitment of all the new components designed to reside inside and on top. Speaking of which, a new high-capacity, high-pressure, internal gerotor oil pump supplies the engine's lifeblood as it feeds from the bottom of the case. Other changes in the case include a new engine-mounting footprint. When compared to existing H-D-style cases, the X-Wedge's mounts sit higher in the front and lower in the rear - this means that the X-Wedge will not fit into a frame designed for an Evo-style or Twin-Cam-style engine. We do know, however, that both Daytec and Rolling Thunder are currently working on chassis designed for the new powerplant. Although the engine mounts have changed, the X-Wedge will still bolt up to a standard primary drive and transmission

The X-Wedge is available with fuel injection only; there are no carbureted versions. A 2-1/16-inch throttle body stashed behind the familiar looking S&S teardrop air cleaner handles induction chores. Instead of mounting the fuel injectors traditionally in the intake manifold, they have been relocated to the heads (just above the intake ports) due to space considerations. The injectors are rated at 34.8 lbs/hr @ 3 BAR fuel pressure.

Engine management is performed by S&S's proven Closed-Loop Variable Fuel-Injection System. The system utilizes an array of sensors such as; a crank position sensor, manifold absolute pressure sensor (map sensor), throttle-position sensor, ambient air temperature sensor, cylinder head temperature sensor and an oxygen probe in each exhaust pipe. Information is relayed from the sensors the electronic control unit (ECU) which analyzes the information and then makes adjustments to the base map (a sort of road map for operation of the CLVFI). The beauty of the system is that as the engine runs, the system makes constant corrections to the base map to ensure the engine is performing at its optimum level.

X-Wedge Specifications (117 cubic-inch version)
Bore: 4.125 Inches
Stroke: 4.375 Inches
Displacement: 117 Cubic Inches
Compression Ratio: 9.75:1
Cylinder Head: 2 valve Cross Wedge
Valves: 2.0-inch intake/1.6-inch exhaust
Pistons: Forged with a 0.927-inch wrist pin bore
Vee Angle: 56.25 degrees
Cam Drive: Gates 30mm belt with automatic tensioner
Valvetrain: Hydraulic roller tappets and pushrods
Crankshaft: Forged one-piece construction
Connecting Rods: 7.400 inches, forged split design
Bearing Type: Tri-metal plain style
Oiling System: Dry sump with internal gerotor pump
Induction: 2-1/16" throttle body
Fuel Injectors: 34.8 lbs/hr @ 3 bar fuel pressure
Engine Management: S&S closed-loop VFI
Engine Weight: 163 lbs

And now the photos:


The new face of large-displacement, high-performance, air-cooled, V-Twins: the S&S Cycle X-Wedge. When released in the fall of 2007 this EPA-compliant package will be available in various displacements to accommodate the needs of various OEMs.


The X-Wedge from S&S represents the future of the V-Twin market, as motorcycles face ever more stringent restrictions to noise and pollution emissions.


Newly designed forged pistons are fastened to the connecting rods via a 0.927-inch wrist pin. Due to the engine's 56.25-degree vee, it is not necessary to notch the piston skirts to keep them from hitting one another at BDC.


The new X-Wedge engine from S&S was designed so that the leftovers coming out of this exhaust flange were cleaner than those out of a standard V-Twin.


Unlike most American V-Twins the X-Wedge is set up to run side-by-side, plain bearing, two-piece connecting rods.


The revolutionary design of the X-Wedge includes three belt-driven camshafts, and a completely new internal oil pump. The Gates Corporation designed the 30mm toothed drive belt specifically for this application. The number-one pulley drives the shared intake camshaft. The number-two pulley drives the rear exhaust camshaft. The number-three pulley drives the front exhaust camshaft. The number-four pulley is affixed to the pinion shaft and drives all three cams. Number five is the automatic tensioner, and numbers six and seven are idlers.


This cutaway of the cylinder reveals the X-Wedge's massive amount of cooling fin area. Another way S&S assures efficient heat transfer is through the use of an aggressive liner designed to lock the thick cast-iron cylinder piece to the aluminum cylinder. Sealing of both the cylinder and the head benefit from the five-stud pattern used to affix them to the cases rather than the four studs used on H-D-style motors.


The X-Wedge utilizes a single 2-1/16-inch throttle body to regulate airflow prior to entering the intake manifold. Monitoring conditions is an array of sensors that feed information to S&S's Closed-Loop Variable Fuel Injection system. The rectangular aluminum pieces inboard of the rockerboxes sit on the top of the head-mounted fuel injectors.

Originally published by Steve Bohn, Motorcycle USA Website, Tuesday, March 20, 2007
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

Scott

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Re: NEW 2 litre HESKETH...!!!!!!!
« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2014, 09:40:50 AM »
Not ssen myself but David S had the opportunity to go to Goodwood Festival of Speed and witness the new bike there.  He has written an article for the SOCK which will be published in one of forthcoming issues... something to watch out for!

Would I invest in one (if I had the money) - yes.

Scott Greig

David S

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Re: NEW 2 litre HESKETH...!!!!!!!
« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2014, 06:06:30 PM »
Yes, I did see it at the Goodwood Festival of Speed last month (June).

I looks superb and certainly seems to be a good follow-on from the 1982 V1000.

I tried it for size and found it suited me well. The footpegs are set back while the bars are flat and forward so you adopt a quite aggressive 'street fighter' position. On the road I guess lift from the breeze will take the weight off the wrists to some extent and make for a comfortable ride.

Since then the bike has made an appearance at the Bexhill Motofest De La Warr Pavilion where it took centre stage and there are plans for it to appear on the track at Donington - 8/9/10 August.

And, Motor Cycle News has just published the first road test (30th July MCN). Star rating = 4 out of 5. A better start than the V1000 in 1981/2. May it continue to succeed.

As mentioned, there's a brief report on my day at Goodwood in the next HOC 'Sock'.

DWS