Author Topic: Once More Into the Fray...  (Read 3849 times)

Miti

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Once More Into the Fray...
« on: December 08, 2013, 01:19:29 AM »
Last year, I had intended to get stuck into my V1000 and replace the timing chains... My bike has had something of a chequered history and I've no real idea how many miles the engine has done... I do know that the timing chains run tight, slack, tight, slack as the engine rotates and that I'm not at all keen on this idiosynchracy...

I've already been told that "no-one ever has problems with the timing chains" and "they all do that" so I've not put the work down as a priority - good job as I had to have my left lower biceps tendon reattached at about the time I'd hoped to start the work last year - NOT the sort of job you want to be doing with just one arm...

The bike has been running reasonable well this year, but leaks from around the sock areas have convinced me to get started, and to remove the "socks" the timimg chains have to be removed (from the top end anyway).

So, I got the bike onto my bench and stripped off the necessary covers:

Pic:  "The Patient is Ready...!" - Click link to open photo in new window

I make sure that the front cyl is at TDC on compression stroke and fit the camshaft locking tools:

Pic:  Both camshaft tools fitted - Click link to open photo in new window

Interesting to note that I had to "tweak" the position of the crank to get the camshaft tools properly fitted:

Pic: Looks like the cams are about 6o out... - Click link to open photo in new window

I'll be using a TDC indicator when I reset the valve timing, just to be sure...

With the camshafts locked, the two LH thread sprocket nuts can come off:

Pic:  "Look Ma..! - No nuts..!!" = Click link to open photo in new window

Before the lower helical gear/camchain sprocket can be removed, the timing gear support plate has to be removed... Only three dome headed bolts, but they're buggers!!  Mick B advised me (ages ago) that any work on these should be conducted painstakingly and involve an impact driver, combined with an eclectic collection of fine hammers...  I took him at his word and introduced all three to the business end of an old rear axle, rapidly propelled by a vintage Bedfordshire Spanner (A tried and trusted "percussive loosening" process that has enjoyed great success in such endeavours...) As Mr Loaf is oft quoted as saying: "Two outta three ain't bad."  Unfortunately, two out of three doesn't get the bloody support plate off and after said third bolt completely rounded out (just as Mick said it might) I had to resort to a modicum of drilling... The bolt didn't like that either...

Pic:  Awwww.. Rats!! - That's just not Fair..!! - Click link to open photo in new window

Fortunately, the snapped bit "unscrewed" quite easily and I managed to drill off the head and then a neat hole down the shank of the bolt.  I then tapped in an "Easy-Out" (remember them..?)

Pic:  Coming along nicely now... - Click link to open photo in new window

And success... Now need a new bolt (I'll probably replace all three).

Pic:  Great stuff..!!  One less problem to sort - Click link to open photo in new window

Which allowed me to remove the timing gear support plate and get into the LH threaded nut securing the oil-pump pinion to its shaft, rapidly followed by the pump pinion and the front cyl timing gear:

Pic:  Really getting into it now, soon have that chain out - Click link to open photo in new window

Once the timing gear was out, the chain simply comes straight out too.  Then quickly removing the tensioner blade's lower spindle, that was out too, and we're just nine bolts and about six hours away from getting the sock off... ::) ::)

So... 4 bolts between Sock and head (with spacers - an EN 10 mod).  5 bolts between sock and crankcase and the sock is "loose" but still held captive by the protruding camshafts... Back over to the other side, remove both cam bearing caps (after the retaining tools have been removed) and the cams slide neatly out, freeing the sock from the engine...  Which gave a nice view of some "hidden problems":

Pic:  Surely they're called "o-rings" because they're shaped like an "O"..? - Click link to open photo in new window :o

It looks as though a sealant has been applied that's incompatible with the material the o-rings are made of... At least four of the o-rings have swollen up and distorted... It's begining to look as though my oil leaks may not have been the bolts holding the stationary camchain blade after all.... :-\

Well, that done, I wrapped up for the evening as Mrs M is still quite fond of me (after all these years) and often regards it as rude of me to stay in the garage all night... More, as it happens...

Jeff
« Last Edit: December 08, 2013, 07:53:10 PM by Miti »
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

R3SC

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Re: Once More Into the Fray...
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2013, 05:53:02 PM »
Hi Jeff,

It's really good to read your post and see how strip downs such as this are done and what the pitfalls are!

A couple of questions, firstly, where did you get the camshaft holding tools from? I expect you to say that you made them! Secondly, when you removed the socks from the crankcase mouth, were the screws M6 or did you find that they were an imperial size with a course thread?

Also, where will you obtain the replacement oils seals from? Are they standard metric items or will you be making them from suitable "O" ring stock?

All I can say is keep up the good, nocturnal work and I look forward to reading the next installment!

Regards

Pete.

Miti

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Re: Once More Into the Fray...
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2013, 07:48:21 PM »
Hi Pete;

The screws holding the sock to the crankcase mouth appear to be M5... I'll pop out and double check later...

The o-rings between the sock and the head don't appear to have been the "correct" ones... They have all come out distorted and there is barely any protrusion beyond the grooves they sit in... (Zoom in on this photo to see what I mean.)  Given that mine is an EN10 motor with the "floating" sock to head joint, I'm not surprised I've had an oil leak in this area...

It's taken me a good two hours to clean all the silicone out of the grooves and off the casing faces and then "trial" various different o-rings and nitrile cords in the grooves...

I've come up wih two sizes: The smaller ones appear to be 15mm x 2mm and the larger ones 63m x 3mm (probably 21/2" x 1/8").

The camshaft holding tools were sold off at the factory auction... I picked one up at via Ebay and the other is on long term loan from another member.  There are no index marks on the camshafts, so, unless you make your own marks prior to disassmbly, these tools are pretty much the only way to set the cam timing...

Next step is to scan the gasket faces and make up gaskets.  I see Mr Sleeman has introduced gaskets between the sock and the cyl head in his rebuilds, so if it's good enough for him...

More, as it happens...

Jeff
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

R3SC

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Re: Once More Into the Fray...
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2013, 10:28:12 PM »
Hi Jeff,

As you are probably aware, the issue I see with gaskets is that they compress and in this case where the sock is retained in two different planes, it means that there will be some compromise re mating faces/datums. At least with an O ring, once it's compressed, the case will seat firmly onto the cylinder head.

How thick were you thinking the gaskets would be?

Pete.

Miti

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Re: Once More Into the Fray...
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2013, 02:53:59 PM »
Hi Pete;

Yes, that's been noted by Colin Evans too... One of the problems that plagued the early V1000s was that the different rates of expansion twixt camchain cases and cylinder barrel/head assy meant that the small bolts at the base of the sock were sometimes literally pulled out of the crankcase, with distressingly oil results...

Part of the EN10 series of updates sought to resolve this issue:  The number of screws attaching the chaincase to the cyl head and sequence for reattaching the chaincase to the crankcase has been seriously revised... There are now only four screws twixt chaincase and cyl head.  These are equipped with steel spacers that limit the amount that the case can be pulled against the head, allowing for a certain amount of "slippage".  The new sequence calls for these four screws to be fastened hand tight, then the chaincase to crankcase screws screws fully tightened, then the four chaincase to head screws to be fully tightened.

Allowing the chaincase to "slide" against the cyl head resolves the problem with the chaincase to crankcase screws pulling out, but also demands that the o-rings between the chaincase and the cyl head are in perfect condition... Mine certainly weren't and I'm also suspicious that they may not be the correct size - They're quite badly distorted and it's difficult to know if they have distorted due to poor selection/fitment, or due to some adverse reaction to the tons of silicone sealant used around them..?

And on that matter... If the joint is suposed to slide, surely some sort of none-setting sealant would be more appropriate than RTV silicone..?  I've had good results with Blue Hylomar in the past and the tech info the manufacturer offers seems to fit the bill exactly...  Hmmm.. I feel a couple of phone calls coming on...

Jeff
« Last Edit: December 09, 2013, 03:02:48 PM by Miti »
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

Dave Snr

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Re: Once More Into the Fray...
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2013, 09:13:53 PM »
Hi Jeff,

I can offer my input on the O ring sizes.
When I overhauled my heads, Oct 2011 with 60 k miles on the clock, the O rings were still in very good condition, unlike yours!
So they were easy to measure.
O rings are specified by internal diameter, thickness and rubber quality.
Took mine to Eriks who measured the larger ones (2 per head) as 58X2.5 and the smaller ones (4 per head) as 12X1.5.
(I think you must be measuring and quoting the outside diameter.)
Rubber quality is nitrile rubber.
Eriks were able to supply them from stock and I had to have spares to get the order up to £10 minimum order value.
Fitted them with a small amount of black oil resistant silicone to hold them in the grooves but nothing on the face that has to slide slightly.
Bike now has another 15k miles since the rebuild with no oil leaks, so those sizes worked for me.
Hope that helps
Dave H

Miti

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Re: Once More Into the Fray...
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2013, 09:45:41 PM »
Thanks Dave.

That might help a lot actually...  Yes, I've quoted the external dimensions and I was certainly going to go with thicker cord dia than you've mentioned...  I already noted that the larger o-ring was sitting in a deeper groove and your info matches that to a tee...

I'm using nitrile o-rings from a generic kit and nitrile cord from a universal DIY kit that has gotten me out of many a fix in the past.

Paul S has also sent up some of the steel tubes he's using in the Kingswood engines.  They form a tubular "bridge" between the head and the internal space inside the camchain case and releive some of the pressure from the smaller o-rings.  They also prevent surplus silicone from being squeezed into the voids inside the o-rings.  This surplus silicone reduces the rate at which oil can drain out of the heads and contributes to the engine's oil consumption by pressurising the oil contained in the head and valve pockets...

The tubes are 10mm o/d with a 1mm wall thickness... I need to get back into the garage to measure up and cut them to length properly...

BTW... For those who have been wondering...The new camchains are the correct size and No. of links and are indistinguishable in length from the originals...  But now I'm this far down that path, they're going in anyway... I'll keep the old ones as "spares" - at least until I've seen how the new ones work out...

Jeff
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

Miti

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Re: Once More Into the Fray...
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2013, 09:54:23 AM »
Sorry... No photos with this post... Bloomin' kids used all the AA batteries up!!! >:(

Busy weekend, but not so much done in the garage... I spent a lot of time cleaning/checking, researching and checking again...

The results were... According to reference material I've been given on o-rings, the originals fitted in both my bike and Dave H's are too thin...   I tried some 2.6mm cord in the larger grooves and there was almost no protrusion at all... The next biggest I had in the kit is 3.0mm, so I've used that.  I also found that 2.4mm thick o-rings in the smaller recesses gave the best results... :-\

Perhaps the cyl heads have different depth grooves, depending on who machined them..????

I found that the steel tube Paul had sent up was 10mm dia x 1mm wall thickness... It fits very neatly into the oil drain holes in the cyl head, but its a VERY tight fit in the camchain case... Paul said that the chain case would need opening up to allow movement around the tubes, but the holes for the four (10mm dia) spacers already fitted are 12mm... Opening up the drain holes in the chaincase to the same size (allowing the same degree of movement) would break through into the spacer holes and I don't think that's ever going to be a good thing... :-\

And... on reassembly, I found that the drain holes in the head and chaincase don't line up perfectly... They're definitely on different centres too... I decided to do without the metal tubes... ::)

So, new gasket for the chaincase /crankcase joint (0.8mm gasket paper with Loctite non-setting
flange sealant applied to both sides
). I used a smear of the same sealant on the o-rings and a thin bead of Dow-Corning clear RTV silicone around the mating face of the chaincase, where it abuts against the cyl head.  I've also invested in some Loctite anaerobic thread sealant for the chain tensioner screws, which was fitted and allowed to dry the day before I assembled the case back on the engine... 8)

Chain-case refitted, I meticulously cleaned any surplus sealant fron the drain holes and set about fitting the new camchain... First thing was a 100% check that the piston was @ TDC... It wasn't. ::)

As was noted in an earlier post, the crank was at about 6o BTDC when the cam tools aligned on the cams... I used a dial timing indicator, screwed into the plug hole to precisely determine TDC and refitted the cams, adding the cam timing tools to the cams at the same time...

The front timing chain is the more difficult of the two to fit... The timing sprocket teeth sit behind the crank drive teeth, so it's a bit of a faff to get the chain meshed properly, but not a real problem... Once meshed, the woodruff key, sprocket flange and sprocket can be fitted to the exhaust cam and the slack taken out of the "tight" side of the camchain...

It's important to note that, as the cam sprockets are of the "adjustable" (vernier..?) type, there are two sprocket positions which are very close to being correct (one before and one after the correct one).  These positions give a misalignment between the sprocket and the mounting flange of just over 1mm, so it looks pretty damn close.  But the correct position is absolutely bang on... It's worth faffing about a bit, because the difference in the slack in the tight side of the camchain between the wrong and right positions is huge, it would definitely muck up the valve timing... :P

Once the lock washer/pin was correctly fitted, I screwed on the LH threaded nut and moved onto the inlet cam... Same process applies... Rotating the sprocket anti-clockwise tensions the chain between the two sprockets and ensures that all available slack is between the inlet cam sprocket and the crank drive sprocket...  With both sprockets correctly positioned, the tensioner blade can be adjusted for the +/- 3mm movement in the centre of the top chain run...

BTW:  I refitted the timing gear support plate before applying any tension to the chain... Those spindles are quite long and need all the support they can get...

Next will be peeling the tank and front air filter box out of the way to gain access to the rear cam covers...  I've noted that there's an oil-leak into the ignition trigger housing, so that'll be getting a good looking at as part of that piece of work...  Ho Hum...

Jeff
« Last Edit: December 17, 2013, 02:59:56 PM by Miti »
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

R3SC

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Re: Once More Into the Fray...
« Reply #8 on: December 17, 2013, 08:35:09 AM »
Hi Jeff,

Regarding the different O ring groove sizes, you're probably right. One thing that i'm learning during the strip down of my bike is that the only thing that is consistent is the inconsistency! Different screw lengths doing the same job, some holes helicoiled, others not, mixtures of metric and imperial bolts used in a totally random manner, etc etc!

I am however, enjoying the rebuild now that it's on its way back together!

Keep up the good, informative work!

Pete.

Miti

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Re: Once More Into the Fray...
« Reply #9 on: December 17, 2013, 03:15:07 PM »
... the only thing that is consistent is the inconsistency! Different screw lengths doing the same job, some holes helicoiled, others not, mixtures of metric and imperial bolts used in a totally random manner...

I've found that, in the majority, the fasteners are metric.  There are a few notable exceptions though...

When I first started working on my bike, i noticed that some screws were only held in by the silicone... I soon sorted those out with some nice stainless inserts...  FYI here's what I've found around my bike:

Timing casing screws: M6 - Various lengths
Clutch/generator casing screws: M6 - Various Lengths
Clutch adjuster cover screws: M6 x 12mm CSK (4)
Generator cover screws: M5 x 20mm (4)
Oil Filter Cover screws: M4 x 12mm (3)
Clutch slave cyl screws: M4 x 15mm (4)
Camchain covers ("V1000"): M5 - Various Lengths (11 on each)
Camchain casing-crankcase screws: M5 x 20mm (5 on each)
Cam bearing/front cyl hd screws: M6 x 20mm (4 on each)

I'll update this and maybe cut/paste it into a different thread for reference...

If there any specific screws/bolts you need dimensions for, let me know...

Jeff
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

Miti

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Re: Once More Into the Fray...
« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2014, 11:04:21 AM »
After an enjoyable Christmas/New Year break, it was time to get back into the garage and sort out the valve clearances/oil leaks/camchain for the rear cylinder of my V1000.

I removed the cam covers and the camchain cover and started to set up the engine for TDC on the firing stroke for the rear cyl… I use a dial timing indicator to precisely gauge when the piston is at the top of its stroke and then slide the camshaft holding tools onto the cams…  This is where I met my first problem; I couldn’t get the holding tool onto the rear exhaust cam.  The flats on the cam were partially obscured by the LHS camshaft needle roller bearing.  It was protruding from the cyl head casting by about 8mm..!

I checked the inlet cam.  The bearing was protruding, but nowhere near as much, so I fitted the holding tool (had to rotate the crank a few degrees to get it on) then loosened off the cam sprocket nuts (LH threads) and proceeded to strip down the rear cyl so that the ignition trigger unit, both cams, camchain, tensioner and camchain casing were removed…

Aaargh!  The tensioner is worn out..!!  The slipper material has worn down almost to the copper rivets and there are “witness marks” suggesting that the chain has just been contacting the metal blade… Bugger!!

First things first… Why are those bearings protruding..?  My first thoughts were that the bearings might be loose or damaged in some way… I carefully inspected the cages for signs of rotation and the needle rollers for signs of roughness… They both seemed to be fine… Hmmm…?  I collected a large nut/bolt and some stiff washers and set them up so that I could pull the bearings into their correct positions…  Both slid in nicely – not loose at all.  I wonder if the clearance could open enough for these bearings to “wander” when the head is hot..?

I measured the valve clearances prior to removing the cams and set about replacing the shims on the three valves where the clearances were way out of spec…  Thus exposing another problem..!!  The exhaust cam followers (or “buckets”) are badly worn.  The lower edges have been honed so that they’re almost razor sharp and the followers have an almost barrel-shaped appearance… I measured the difference in diameter at the top and bottom of each one and found the bottom at least 1mm narrower than the top…  They rock all over the placed when in situ and they’ll also need to be replaced… Bugger, again..!!

Whilst stripping the aforementioned parts off, it’s been obvious that the centre shaft seal in the ignition trigger unit has been allowing oil to leak past…

The shaft is retained in the unit with a small circlip, so that came apart easily enough… The oil seal is a Viton on manufactured by Gaco, but I couldn’t find any references to the part No. on it and had to resort basic measuring… It appears to be a 14 x 24 x 7mm Viton seal, so I’ve ordered two of those on-line (spares are a good thing..!)

More, as it happens...

Jeff
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

Miti

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Re: Once More Into the Fray...
« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2014, 11:04:59 AM »
Today has been slow at work, so I’ve researched some camchain slipper materials… Looks like the best stuff about is Nylon Polyamide 46 (Stanyl®).  I’ve contacted a local engineering firm who have helped me out plenty of times before and they’ve never heard of this material, but they’re confident that they’ll be able to re-line the tensioner blade with an appropriate material… Here’s hoping…

Jeff
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

Miti

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Re: Once More Into the Fray...
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2014, 10:27:11 PM »
Well... It turns out that Stanyl® is supplied in LARGE sheets that make costs for the wee strip I needed somewhat prohibative... >:(

So, my engineer pal has re-lined the tensoner blade with a much more accessible (and cost-effective) self-lubricating nylon product called Nylatron® Lig PA46

Pic: Re-lined rear tensioner blade:

My pal re-lined the blade right up to the upper end (at my request) as I'd already surmised that a piece of the original slipper material must have come away... The front slpper is lined right up it's top edge, but when I tried to refit the newly lined blade and chain, the chain wouldn't fit between the lining and the cam sprocket...!! :( :(

So, I carefully removed the last section (about 15mm) and tried again... I suspect that someone else had already discovered this problem and that my rear tensioner blade had had material removed for precisely this reason...  The blades are ether different shapes, or simply present to their respective inlet sprockets differently on each cylinder...  The front one allows for a lovely smooth transition from the slipper blade to the sprocket, but the rear one is too high and there is s definite "high spot" in the chain run, just before the chain is picked up by the inlet sprocket...  But it's back in now and I'll "suck it and see" for the 2014 "season"...

Pic: Newly lined rear tensioner and new IWIS camcain fitted, sprockets all timed up (and double checked):

Prior to finally timing the cams, I needed to rebuild the ignition trigger/rear exhaust bearing housing... I'd fitted a nice new oil seal and cleaned all the parts off... Just take a look at this lovely little piece of engineering:

Pic: ignition rotor driveshaft... It's one purpose is to spin the ignition rotor and this part has eight separate sections with different finishes/diameters, etc... Wonderful over-engineering. ;D (apologies for blurred photo).

Yesterday, I finshed inatslling all the cam covers and timing side covers... I've decided that Hesketh ownership can easily lead to a HATRED of silicone sealant...  WHAT a pain it is cleaning off the sealing faces and making sure there's none left in the threads...  Grrrr... >:(

So... While the sealant is going off, it's time to whip the front wheel off and get that tyre looked at... I've not had the front wheel off yet and take a look at this:

Pic: "Are you sure they're genuine cast iron discs..?" "Er... Yeah!"

So, I asked very nicely if Mrs M would kindly pop the wheel over to our local tyre place, with the new Avon Road-Rider that's been awaiting fitment, and it came back this afternoon all sorted (£5.00 to fit, I balance them myself...)  New tyre on, I wanted to clean up the discs and check the bearings before refitting the wheel... One of the bearings felt "notchy", so I popped them both out to check sizes... Check this out:

Pic:  Why is one bearing different to the other..?  I was puzzled by this for a few minutes, then I realised what the problem was... The RHS bearing has lost the centre part of one of the seals...  With a little lateral thinking, I put the pieces together...

Pic:  Looks like the hub has been incorrectly assembled at some time and the speedo drive has worn away the centre of the bearing oil-seal.  This was then removed, turned around and re-inserted with the worn seal facing inwards... Guess which bearing is the "notchy" one..??  Some people shouldn't be allowed to own spanners..!!

That's a couple of 6205-2RS/C3 bearings ordered... That'll give me time to clean up the disks properly before reassembling the hub...

More, next time...

Jeff
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

Miti

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Re: Once More Into the Fray...
« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2014, 10:56:31 PM »
I seem to have left this thread hanging in favour of other task specific threads...

Apologies for that... It's been a busy start to the year...

Suffice to say, today was a big day 'cos my V1000 is running again...  It's been a busy few months and everything appears to have come togther quite nicely now...  There's one oil leak (so far) which annoyingly is coming from the retrn oil hose joint at the crankcase...

Annoyingly because this has a new Dowty seal fitted AND some Loctite thread sealant added... I'll need to remove the pipe again and have another go, which will require removing the tank as the hose joint doesn't rotate and I doubt that forcing ten twists into the hose will do it much good...

Getting the bike re-started wasn't plain sailing... She wasn't "happy" at all at the first couple of goes... One cyl was trying to fire, but the other wasn't interested... I re-checked the crank/timing rotor relationship and discovered that I'd fitted the rotor 90o out...  I don't know how I didn't spot it, but it was quickly removed and fitted correctly...

The bike started up almost immediately after that... I had forgotten just how LOUD this beast is... In the confines of the garage it's almost deafening...

Before the bike was started, I'd connected up a strobe timing light to check the ignition timing... After repositioning the ignition rotor, I double checked the rotor/trigger coil relationship against a photo taken prior to strip-down...

Checking the ignition timing is an incredibly messy processs... The alternator has the timing marks stamped & scribed onto it (22o @ 3,000 rpm, 34o max advance) but while you're getting down there with your strobe light, the alternator rotor is flinging oil absolutely everywhere..!!

I found that I couldn't set the timing correctly with the trigger coil set as per the pic, I had to relocate the screws into the 2nd set of holes in the trigger housing...  I can't say if the timing was correct prior to me starting all this work - I've corrected valve timing errors and the ignition timing is inextricably linked to the valve timing... I'm fairly certain that it's OK now... My strobe has an advance setting where you can "dial in" the required number of degrees of advance, and with 34o dialled in the flash was neatly illuminating the TDC mark at around 4,500rpm...  I gave up after that as I didn't have a Sou'Wester on and the oil rain was becoming unbearable..!!

So...  Here's a quick precis of this winter's changes:

Engine:
2 x Iwis timing chains fitted
1 x timing chain tensioner (rear) re-lined
2 x worn cam followers replaced (rear/exhaust)
1 x broken oil-pipe replaced (from timing cover to crankcase)
1 x NOS Fram oil filter fitted (Unipart one fitted previously)
2 x NGK DR8EA spark plugs fitted
Valve timing corrected
Valve clearances checked/corrected
New o-rings between timing chain cases and cyl heads fitted
New gaskets between timing chain cases and crankcase fitted
New oil seal fitted to ign trigger unit shaft
New Dowty seals/copper washers fitted throughout
Thread sealant fitted to timing chain slipper blade retaining screws
Clutch hydraulic fluid changed, system bled

Chassis:
Front wheel, forks, brakes, mudguard removed and refitted with brake calipers at rear of forks:

All brake disks removed, cleaned, painted with Hi-Zinc rust preventative paint and re-fitted
Rear brake bled and adjustments made to parallelogram floating torque arm arrangement
Both front and rear wheels fitted with 10 x stainless steel low head allen bolts and flanged nyloc nuts. (all A2-70)
Front wheel fitted with 100/90V19 Avon Roadrider tyre
Front mudguard "relieved" internally to prevent tyre fouling
Drive chain removed, cleaned, examined for wear, two links removed and chain refitted (after finding that a new 98 link chain leaves you with only half the available adjustment left!!)

Electrical:
2nd Hand Shindengen FF008EE rectifier/regulator unit fitted on bespoke bracket
SS3AW charge light simulator unit fitted
 
And after all that, some of the old beastie is in need of a right good polish...

If it needs anything more than that and the addition of fuel/oil during this year it'll soon be up for sale!!

Jeff
« Last Edit: March 16, 2014, 11:03:01 PM by Miti »
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)