Author Topic: Tank Sealing/Lining.  (Read 1636 times)

Miti

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Tank Sealing/Lining.
« on: August 29, 2012, 08:42:53 PM »
I was chatting with another HOC member last night about rust contaminated carbs... It's a problem I've had to deal with myself and can be a right PITA to resolve completely...

Of course, it's not cleaning the carbs out that causes the real problem, it's stopping the debris from an old tank getting in there in the first place...

My V1000 tank has been "professionally" re-painted  - the crests face backwards and there's a couple of "inclusions" that just shouldn't be there... So it came as little surprise to me that the lack of attention to detail in the tank refinishing was reflected in a complete lack of attention inside the tank...  ::)

It's 30 years old... Probably NEVER been cleaned out and there was evidence that surface rust was getting through the tap filters and into the carbs...  It was about time I sorted it...

So, I drained the tank, removed both taps and the filler cap and set to...  I used a product called "POR 15" tank sealer.  It's an American product, available in the UK through Frost Restoration Products.



At £38.50 (plus P&P) it's not the cheapest product around... But that prices covers the whole kit, not just the sealer...  The kit comprises a 946ml bottle of "Marine Clean" - a highly concentrated detergent which to dissolves and removes gum and varnish, a 946ml bottle of "Metal Ready" -  to remove rust, etch the interior surface, and leave a zinc phosphate coating and a 236ml can of POR-15 Petrol Tank Sealer.

Full instructions for use come with the kit and you'd be well advised to ensure that you have a couple of weeks to complete the job.  Yes, really...  The tank has to be thorough dried after the etching solution is rinsed out and I've done two tanks now... The first took over a week before it was properly dry (winter job) and the second (the Hesketh one) took five days - I sat it on top of an oil-filled radiator and let it bake, that did the trick!

So, how's it done..?  First you need three corks... To to seal the tap outlets and one to seal the filler neck... I bought mine from Just Corks (who even knew such a company existed..?)  You need to select your corks so that the I/D of your orifi is the same as the middle dia of the cork... I fitted a woodscrew as a "handle" in the filler neck one, 'cos the top of it was beneath the top of the neck when pressed home... (I'll dig out the details of the ones I bought and update this post at a later date).
 


I sat my (empty) tank on a workmate and used a pressure washer to start off with... The lance fitted neatly inside the neck and the heavy duty degreaser I used seemed to clean quite a lot of cack out of the tank...

Then, I sealed up the tap outlets, chucked in a good handful of 1/2" clout nails (for abrasion) and poured in the marine clean... It goes in with hot water, so a kettle is needed... Then the tank filler is sealed and you'll get a REAL good workout thrashing that lot about... It weighs plenty and you have to make certain that every spot of the inside surface is cleaned...  Takes about an hour...





Once done, that gets drained out (a large washing up bowl comes in VERY handy) and all the nails shaken out... A good rinse (hot water again) and it's ready to be sealed and the etch solution banged in... This calls for a few old towels and some wooden blocks to prop the tank up with... You need to ensure that every spot of the inside surface is exposed to the etch solution, for at least 20 mins, so the tank has to be rotated many times, through every possible axis...



That done, the etch solution is drained (bowl again) and the tank is put aside to thoroughly dry...

A week later, it's time for the POR 15 sealer... It's like a can of silver paint (I think there's a large metal content in it)... I made a cardboard funnel and taped it into the filler neck.  Tap holes well sealed, I poured it in, removed the funnel and sealed the filler neck...  Another 45 mins of thrashing the tank around to ensure every spot of the inside surface is coated, then the tap bungs are pulled and the excess allowed to drain into the bowl...   This is important as the sealer dries to a sponge-like finish if allowed to "puddle".  I left the tank over the bowl overnight, to ensure that all the excess had drained... It's heartbreaking to see how much of the sealant you don't use, but waste is inevitable as it's essential that there's enough to freely coat ALL of the inside...



And that's it... POR 15 recommend that the tank be left 5 days before fuel is added.  I left mine a couple of weeks as I was not using the bike just then... It's been in service now for a few months and not a spot of trouble with debris in the carbs, so I'm well pleased...

Miti
« Last Edit: August 30, 2012, 07:48:50 AM by Miti »
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

David S

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Re: Tank Sealing/Lining.
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2012, 03:30:48 PM »
I've used the POR15 process on a number of tanks and can confirm that it works very well and seems to be resistant to the effects of ethanol. One of my tanks (Rex-Acme) has held fuel for four years without the flaking caused by ethanol on earlier tank sealants.

More recently I had to reseal a BSA fuel tank.

It had been professionally restored (Lewis and Templeton - a superb job) in the early 1980s when ethanol was not perceived as a problem. However, a couple of years ago the sealant started to lift off the tank surface and drop bits into the fuel line.

To start I used some proprietary sealant remover (very volatile stuff) which caused the old sealant to lift off the tank in tiny crisp flakes - the noise while the chemical process took place was a bit like making popcorn.

I then used the POR15 process as instructed - carefully and slowly. I'm happy with the results.

Important: For the sealant remover and the POR15 stuff all the hazard/health warnings are given with the kit but I'd add another. To make sure the chemicals (for all stages) completely cover the inside of the tank it is usual to shake and roll the tank. This causes some of the chemicals to froth and pressurise the tank. Make sure the bungs used to seal the tap and filler holes don't pop and spray liquid - it might spoil your paintwork and you.

David S

Tig

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Re: Tank Sealing/Lining.
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2013, 05:52:54 PM »
Hi Guys

I am just getting used to this Forum (again) but have found your input on the tank sealer very valuable and i will now make much better use in due course....

Tig

Miti

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Re: Tank Sealing/Lining.
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2013, 10:06:35 PM »
I managed 1,000 miles on the bike last year and not a spot of trouble with contaminants in the carbs... t's a real faff getting the tank sealed, but very much worth it, I reckon...

Jeff
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)