Author Topic: Chain Oiler..?  (Read 918 times)

Miti

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Chain Oiler..?
« on: November 17, 2012, 08:53:12 PM »
The 1,000 miles I managed to cover this year has battered the hell out of the DID chain on my V1000...  I've kept it oiled and tensioned but I reckon an automatic oiler is the only way to guarantee chain longevity...

I have a nice new Scottoiler in the garage and I'm planning on fitting that over the winter hiatus.  My plan is to fit the oil feed at the front sprocket and take the vacuum from the rear cylinder...  I had hoped to fit the RMV (oiler) under the RHS panel, but there's not enough room, so it'll probably have to go at the rear of one of the LHS frame tubes... Not ideal as it'll be clearly visible (but easier to adjust and refill).

Anyone have any experience of this on a V1000/Vampire..?

Miti
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

Dave Snr

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Re: Chain Oiler..?
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2012, 03:13:40 PM »
I fitted a Scottoiler to my V1000 when I first had it. The oiler will fit under the RH cover, if you position it to the right of the fuse box where the rear airbox/airbox rubber is and the cover will still go on and hide it. I still have the bracket attached to my airbox and could post a photo if that would help.

The Scottoiler certainly did a good job of coating the chain with sticky oil, but I found it also coats the rear sprocket and sidewall of the rear tyre with sticky oil, so I removed it and sold it to a mate for his VFR.

My chain philosophy now is to buy a good chain - I use DID X-ring gold chain 50VM as fitted to most superbikes - fireblade, R1, GSX and so on. Because the Hesketh chain is short at 96 links you can often buy short chains at bargains prices. Last chain I bought from BikespeedUK was a 100 link VM for £40 including postage (of course I shortened it to 96 links).
Every 300 to 400 miles after a run when the chain is hot, I oil it with gear oil, EP80 and wipe this off with a clean cloth. This gets rid of the road dirt and keeps the x rings lubed. Hardly ever needs adjustment, maybe after 5k miles. I tend to change the chain at 10k miles. Sprockets seem to last 25 to 30k miles - the small gearbox sprocket always wears the most. Changing from 15T to 16T seems to improve the sprocket life, as well as improving the fuel consumption, lowering the revs etc.

Dave H

Miti

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Re: Chain Oiler..?
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2012, 09:46:23 PM »
Hi Dave;

Yes please, a photo would be great... I did muck about trying the oiler under the RHS cover, but it seemed to foul the toolkit pocket...  Could be my "Gashco" toolkit that's causing the problem

I know what you mean about the oiler's capability for "over-oiling" the rear sprocket, but getting oil on the tyre sounds like the wrong oil, or the oiler having been woefully over-adjusted...  I have a good friend who actually works at Scottoiler, so lessons on fitting/adjustment are plentiful... He's never fitted one to a V1000 before though so best position is gonna be trial and error...

BTW:  Did you run the oil feed to the front or rear sprocket?

Jeff
1975 Triumph Trident 750 (New Project)
1980 Yamaha XS1100 (Midnight Special)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Trike Project)
1981 Yamaha XS1100 Sport (Reg'd 1985)
1982 Hesketh V1000 (Pre-Production Engine)

Dave Snr

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Re: Chain Oiler..?
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2012, 09:31:32 AM »
Hi Jeff,

Here goes with my first uploaded photo, hopefully of my rear airbox:-



I've written "Scottoiler" in the position I remember the oiler was.
Mine had a rubber collar round the oiler which bolted to the small bracket you can see still attached to the airbox.
Looking at the Scottoiler website, the oiler looks the same as mine but the simple rubber collar mine had is now replaced with a more substantial plastic bracket.
You need to get the oiler alongside the rubber hose connecting carb to airbox so that the toolkit doesn't foul it.

My pipe was connected along the swing arm to oil in front of the rear sprocket.
Your idea to feed at the gearbox sprocket is a good one - much neater if you can support the pipe OK.

Good luck.

Dave H